Broth-Based Tomato and Zucchini Garden Soup

I first made this easy-to-digest simple soup to break my two week water fast. After fasting, the digestive track needs some really simple, nutrient dense food to build back up to it’s normal digestive power. As you can see, I’ve taken extra steps like pre-steaming the veggies, and also peeling/ roughly seeding the tomatoes. This isn’t necessary, but is ideal if you’re looking for a really easy to digest meal. The skin and seeds of tomatoes contain a lot of immune-triggering compounds. I also omitted garlic an onions, which I would normally include in a soup.

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I made this soup while spending some time at my uncles’ country house in Burgundy, France. These vegetables were actually picked right from their organic garden, minutes before cooking. Such a divine gift! Real food in all it’s glory.

Broth-Based Tomato and Zucchini Garden Soup

Ingredients

Note: the quantities here essentially do not matter. I kept my zucchini to tomato ratio at about 60% zucchini and 40% tomatoes simply because that’s what I harvested from the garden. How many you use depends on how much soup you want to make!

Abundant harvest from the garden, to make this incredible soup!

Abundant harvest from the garden, to make this incredible soup!

  • 3 large organic zucchinis (I used three different varieties)

  • 8 medium sized heirloom organic tomatoes

  • splash of organic extra virgin olive oil

  • sprig of fresh organic thyme

  • 1-2 tsp of wild oregano, dried

  • sea salt to taste

  • fresh organic basil to garnish

  • fresh lemon juice to garnish

  • optional: 3 cloves of organic garlic and a medium sized onion (I did not include them because I made this recipe to consume after a 14 day water fast! And onions/ garlic are too harsh on the stomach that soon)

  • organic, pasture-raised bone broth (enough to cover your vegetables, a few litres). I used homemade chicken bone broth, which you can make following the recipe below but swap the bone marrow bones for a whole chicken carcass! (you can also use any type of bone broth)

Instructions

By steaming the vegetables and peeling/ seeding the tomatoes, you’re increasing digestibility. This isn’t necessary, but ancestrally it was common practice with tomatoes.

By steaming the vegetables and peeling/ seeding the tomatoes, you’re increasing digestibility. This isn’t necessary, but ancestrally it was common practice with tomatoes.

  1. Slice a small “X” on the bottom of the tomatoes, and steam them for about 2-3 minutes. This will enable you to peel them very easily. Remove from heat and let cool while you chop up the zucchini.

  2. Chop the zucchini into small cubes and remove any really pithy/ seedy parts if you have a very large zucchini

  3. Put the zucchini to steam while you peel the tomatoes

  4. After you peel them, roughly remove the seeds. You don’t have to go crazy here, just scoop out the bulk of them with a spoon, to ease digestibility

  5. Remove the zucchini from the steam after 10-15 minutes. It’s not too important, just letting them sweat a bit in the heat before cooking helps you digest.

  6. In a pot, pour 2-3 tablespoons (a few glugs) of high quality olive oil over medium heat

  7. Optional step: if you’re using garlic and onions, brown them first right now before adding anything else (mince the garlic and dice the garlic).

  8. Add in the chopped/ seeded tomatoes, and a few pinches of dried oregano

  9. Raise the heat until they start to simmer and stir until the tomatoes lose their shape and you start to get a tomato sauce feel

  10. Add in your steamed zucchini, and fill the pot with bone broth to the top of the vegetable so that they are almost all submerged

  11. Add in a sprig of fresh thyme and a bay leaf, and optionally you can add some sea salt depending on how salted your broth is

  12. Cover the pot and let it simmer for 1.5 hours, stirring occasionally

  13. Turn off the heat, remove thyme and bay leaf, and using an immersion blender— blend it up!

  14. Garnish with fresh basil, and a squeeze of fresh lemon juice.

Hot Tips

  1. If you don’t use bone broth, I suggest using a few knobs of butter, fresh cream, or coconut milk to thicken it up. Bone broth really adds a rich, thickness to the soup, and simply using water will leave you with a pretty lame soup.

  2. Get creative with vegetables! You can add or omit anything really, carrots, celery, parsnip.. the world is your oyster.

  3. You don’t actually have to blend the soup if you prefer a chunky soup, but for digestibility I’m team blend. Otherwise I often keep it chunky.

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