Forest Bone Broth with Spruce Tips, Pine Pollen, and Chaga

Over the past years I’ve been more and more drawn to the wonderful world of foraging. There is something so incredibly magical about being guided to edible plant matter in the wild, and being able to identify them and then use them to nourish yourself.

This bone broth recipe is inspired by my Canadian roots, and is full of medicinal ingredients from the forests of Canada. You can learn more about pine pollen and chaga by clicking the buttons below (as well as links to companies I trust, and use):

These two adaptogenic substances are some of my favourites, especially because I have actually foraged them myself! The links above will help you identify and properly harvest your own goods, but fear not- there are also amazing companies I trust and use to infuse my broths and life with nutritional goodness and good vibes.


Forest Bone Broth with Spruce Tips, Pine Pollen, and Chaga

INGREDIENTS:

  • 2-3 lbs of organic, pasture-raised chicken carcass (preferably with the skin still on). Another option for very gelatinous broth is using chicken feet, or even whole chicken wings.

  • 1 large organic carrot

  • 1/2 a large organic celery (I save the celery bottoms to use in broth)

  • a big knob of organic ginger

  • 2 cloves of organic garlic

  • a splash of organic apple cider vinegar or juice of 1/2 an organic lemon (this helps extract minerals from the bones)

  • 1 chunk of chaga (or 1/2 tbsp of wild chaga powder)

  • a handful of pine pollen/ needle tips (or 2 tbsp organic spruce tips and 1 tsp of organic raw pine pollen powder)

  • couple sprigs of organic thyme

  • a few fresh wild stinging nettle leaves (or a tsp or dried nettle)

  • big pinch of sea salt

 If using self-foraged pine pollen, you can literally add in a handful of the pollen-filled cones, as well as the needle tips.

If using self-foraged pine pollen, you can literally add in a handful of the pollen-filled cones, as well as the needle tips.

 If you don’t happen to live near the forest or be into foraging, you’re in luck: the  Canadian Pine Pollen Co.  has some epic, organic, sustainably foraged goods that will ship directly to your door!

If you don’t happen to live near the forest or be into foraging, you’re in luck: the Canadian Pine Pollen Co. has some epic, organic, sustainably foraged goods that will ship directly to your door!

 The goods!

The goods!

INSTRUCTIONS:

  1. Fill a blender halfway with filtered/ spring water, add in ginger and garlic and blend until they're completely broken down

  2. Add the ginger/ garlic water to your slow cooker, and then continue to fill your slow cooker halfway with more filtered water

  3. Add a splash of apple cider vinegar

  4. Add the bones, carrots, celery, chaga, pollen/ spruce tips, thyme, nettle, and salt

  5. Fill the rest up with water until the slow cooker is full

  6. Simmer on LOW for 48 hours (I like to keep it oh HIGH for the first 12 hours to get the boil going, but not required)

  7. After 48 hours (sometimes I leave it for 60) strain the liquid (discarding all the solids), and store the liquid in a glass mason jar in the fridge for up to a week.

 Once cooled and refrigerated, your broth will develop a layer of fat. That thick layer of fat is a sign your broth is a total  SUCCESS ! It will melt back down when you re-warm your broth, drink it!!

Once cooled and refrigerated, your broth will develop a layer of fat. That thick layer of fat is a sign your broth is a total SUCCESS! It will melt back down when you re-warm your broth, drink it!!

HOT TIPS:

1- Do not overfill with water or the broth will simmer over the side of the slow cooker and cause a #hotmess

2- After about 24 hours, your broth will have evaporated a decent amount of liquid; refill the pot with more water.

3- You can also freeze broth cubes to extend the life of the broth, and keep it frozen. Pop broth cubes in smoothies, soups, etc; or store them in larger containers in the freezer to defrost and consume at a later date. *If you store broth in glass in the freezer make sure you completely cool the broth first or the glass jar will crack under temp change. Also, make sure your glassware is freezer-friendly; I’ve had many jars crack even when storing already cooled broth*

4- Your broth should be extremely fatty. once cooled, you should notice a thick layer of fat on the top, which is a sign you really made a successful broth. That fat is extremely nutrient dense and should not be discarded! The broth itself should be opaque, and full of vitamins and minerals.

5- Sourcing high-quality organic bones is absolutely imperative when making your own bone broth. Bones store not only minerals, but also heavy metals, so if an animal has led an unnatural lifestyle, not only will the broth lack nutritional value, but it could even be quite dangerous. On a metaphysical level, I genuinely believe we also store energy in our bones, and apart from not wanting to support unethical farming, your broth would contain the energy of a sad, tortured life. Opt for the highest quality bones (they will still be incredibly cheap) and don't be afraid to ASK QUESTIONS to your butcher. If you're unsure: ask. And if you're sure: dig a little deeper.

In-Joy!

Camille